Notebook

Notebook, 1993-

ELEMENTS

Dimension


Alignment, Responsiveness, Measure, Inflection, Pattern, Theory. . . . Range, Extent







C  O  N  S  I  D  E  R  A  T  I  O  N  S 
Magnitude

Measurement

Direction

Scope

Extent

A measuring in a particular direction, along a diameter or principle axis

Importance

Size, etc.

Topology

Serving to define an element within a given set

Serving to define the location [in a space, an event in space-time, etc.]



CATEGORIES OF DIMENSION: [Roget's International Thesaurus, Third Edition. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co., 1962.]

A. General Dimensions:
Size; Littleness; Expansion, Growth; Contraction; Distance; Nearness; Interval

B. Linear Dimensions:
Length; Shortness; Breadth, Thickness; Narrowness, Thinness; Filament; Height; Lowness; Depth; Shallowness; Top; Bottom; Verticalness; Horizontalness; Pendency; Support; Shaft; Parallelism; Obliquity; Inversion; Crossing; Weaving; Sewing

C. External and Internal Dimensions :
Exteriority; Interiority; Centrality; Layer; Covering; Skin; Hair, Feathers; Clothing; Divestment; Environment; Circumscription; Bounds; Enclosure; Interposition; Intrusion; Contraposition; Front; Rear; Side; Right Side; Left Side


R  E  F  E  R  E  N  C  E  S 
Dimension 1. magnitude measured in a particular direction, or along a diameter or principal axis. 2. Usually, dimensions. a. measurement in width, length, and thickness. b. scope or importance: the dimensions of a problem. 3. magnitude; size. 4. Topology, a magnitude that serves to define the location of an element within a given set, as of a point on a line, an object in a space, or an event in space-time 5. dimensions. Informal. measurement... [ME dimensioun < MF dimension, L d’mension- (s. of d’mens—) a measuring = -’on -ION]

Magnitude. 1. size; extent; dimensions. 2. great amount, importance, etc. 3. greatness; great size. 4. moral greatness. 5. Astron. 1. the brightness of a star or other celestial body as viewed by the unaided eye from the earth and expressed by a mathematical ratio of 2.512: a star of the first magnitude is approximately 2 1/2 times as bright as one of the sixth magnitude. b. see absolute magnitude. 6. Math, a number characteristic of a quantity and forming a basis for comparison with similar quantities, as length [ME < L magnitśd—]

[Urdang, Laurence, ed. Random House Dictionary of The English Language. New York: Random House, 1968.]




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