Notebook

Notebook, 1993-

APPROACHES

Bartleby [Look It Up] -- Oxford Art Online - [By Subscription] -- Words of Art: An On-line Glossary of Theory and Criticism for the Visual Arts -- Glossary - ['Artist's on Art' / Dore Ashton] -- ArtLex - [Dictionary of Art Terms]

D


Dada

Daguerreotype - "The first practicable photographic process, in which the image was produced on a silvered copper plate sensitized by iodine. Each image was unique, as it was made directly on to the plate without an intervening 'negative'. The process was invented by a French artist, Louis-Jacques-Mandé Daguerre [1780-1851] and made public in 1839 only a few weeks before Fox Talbot announced the invention of the calotype. Daguerre was also the inventor of the diorama."[Osborne, Harold, editor. The Oxford C ompanion to Twentieth-Century Art. Oxford University Press. 1988.]

Danube School

Dau Al Set [Die with The Seven] - "An artistic association which was formed in Barcelona in 1948 and was active until 1953, publishing a periodical of the same name. Beisdes the poet Joan Arnaldo Puig, the group contained the four artist members Antoni Tàpies, Modesto Cuixart, Joan Ponç and Joan José Tharrats. The artists Jaume Muxart and José Guinovart also collaborated, as did the critics Eduardo Cirlot and Alexandro Cirici-Pellicer. The expressed object of the association was to awaken Barcelona from the artistic and spiritual stagnation into which it had sunk and in pursuit of this aim the members not only encouraged Surrealism, becoming the chief exponents of international Surrealism in Spain, but also acclaimed such diverse native artists as Gaudi and Miró. The group played an important part in preparing the ground for the new indigenous avant-garde which established itself in the mid 1950s and for the introduction of informalism. The printing and format of the magazine Dau al Set were in the hands of Tharrats, who took up painting only in 1950. The illustrations by Ponçe, Tàpies and Cuixart helped to bring these artists to the notice of the public."[Osborne, Harold, editor. The Oxford C ompanion to Twentieth-Century Art. Oxford University Press. 1988.]

Decalcomania

Decorative Arts - "Term embracing applied art and also including objects that are made purely for decoration."[Osborne, Harold, editor. The Oxford C ompanion to Twentieth-Century Art. Oxford University Press. 1988.]

Degenerate Art

Décalcomanie

Décollage

Degenerate Art [Entartete Kunst]

Demise: Erased and Burnt Offerings [Gottlieb, Carla. Beyond Modern Art. New York: E.P. Dutton. 1976]

De Stael

Der Sturm [The Assault]

Design in Movement [Gottlieb, Carla. Beyond Modern Art. New York: E.P. Dutton. 1976]

Deutsche Werkstätten

Dialogue with a Limit [Gottlieb, Carla. Beyond Modern Art. New York: E.P. Dutton. 1976]

Diaper - "An all-over pattern based on small repeated units capable of indefinite extension in any direction. It is found carved in low relief on flat wall surfaces of Romanesque and Gothic architecture, in stained glass, and on the backgrounds of manuscript illuminations, especially of the late 13th and 14th centuries."[Osborne, Harold, editor. The Oxford C ompanion to Twentieth-Century Art. Oxford University Press. 1988.]

Die Brucke [The Bridge]

Dilettante [See Amateur]

Society of Dilettanti

Diorama

Diptych

Directoire Style

The Dissidents

Distortion

Divisionism - "A method and techniquje of painting by which colour effects are obtained not by mixing pigments on the palette but by applying small areas or dots of unmixed pigment on the canvas in such a way that to a spectator standing at an appropriate distance they appear to react together. This method, which produced greater luminosity and brilliance of colour than if the colours are physically mixed, has been employed to some extent by many artists in alla prima painting, although it is contrary to the traditional principles of painting by superimposed glazes and scumbles. Notable precursors of divisionism were Watteau and Delacroix. It was also employed empirically by the Impressionists and in particular by those who adopted the 'rainbow palette' of Renoir. It was not developed systematically and scientifically, however, until Seurat and the Neo-Impressionists. Seurat [in common with other contemporaries] spoke of an 'optical mixture', but [contrary to what is usually stated] the dots do not really fuse in the viewer's eye to make different colours, for they remain visible as dots. Rather, they seem to vibrate, creating something of the shimmering effect experienced in strong sunlight. The effect is noted in Ogden Rood's Modern Chromatics [1879], a treatise on colour theory well known to Seurat. Camille Pissarro, who was closely associated with Seurat at this time, said that the optimum viewing distance for a picture painted by the divisionist method was three times the diagonal measurement. The terms divisionism and pointillism are not always clearly differenetiated, but whereas divisionism refers mainly to the underlying theory, pointillism describes the actual painting techniqjue associated with Seurat and his followers. 'Divisonism' [usually with a capital 'D'] was also the name of an Italian movement, a version of Neo-Impressionism, that flourished in the last decade of the 19th century and the first decade of the 20th century. It was one of the sources of Futurism."[Osborne, Harold, editor. The Oxford C ompanion to Twentieth-Century Art. Oxford University Press. 1988.]

Dong-Ju Landscape Tradition

Donhuang Style

Donkey's Tail

Dotted Manner [See Manière Criblée]

Drifting

Drollery

Drypoint

Dugento [See Quattrocento]

Dumonsstier - "Family of French portrait painters, who carried on the tradition of the Clouets into the middle of the 17th century. About a dozen members of the family are recorded and several of them held court appointments. The earliest of any significance was Geoffroy [c.1510-60] who was court painter to Francis I [1494-1547] and Henry II [1519-59], and the last and best-known member of the dynasty was Daniel [1574-1646]."[Osborne, Harold, editor. The Oxford C ompanion to Twentieth-Century Art. Oxford University Press. 1988.]














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