Notebook

Notebook, 1993-

APPROACHES

Bartleby [Look It Up] -- Oxford Art Online - [By Subscription] -- Words of Art: An On-line Glossary of Theory and Criticism for the Visual Arts -- Glossary - ['Artist's on Art' / Dore Ashton] -- ArtLex - [Dictionary of Art Terms]

A


ABC Art [Synonymous with Minimal Art]

Abstraction - "The term 'abstraction' is used with two different meanings in the literature of 20th-c. art. [1] Non-iconic abstraction, also called 'non-representational', 'non-figurative' and 'non-objective [gegenstandlos]' abstraction, is that mode of abstraction in which neither the work itself nor any of its parts represents or symbolizes objects in the visible world . . . . virtually specific to the painting and sculpture of the 20th c., although of course it has been common in the decorative art of the past. [2] The second and more pervasive kind of abstraction is a mode of representing visible objects which reduces the amount or the paticularity of the detail depicted. It is always a matter of degree . . . . . common to most art of the past but has been carried further and used more self-consciously in the 20th c. than ever before. Together these two kinds of abstraction account for one of the most important features of 20th-c. art up to the emergence of a new taste for exaggerated Realism in the 1960s. Although different in principle, the two modes of abstraction may occur together in a single work; or abstraction by the suppresion of detail may be carried to a point where the representational element is no longer detectable --as for example in some works by Ivon Hitchens, Roger Bissiere, Jean Bazaine, Maurice Estève, etc.

Non-iconic abstraction has two major modes, each prolific of diverse schools and stylistic manifestations. The major modes are Expressive Abstraction and Geometrical Abstraction. The reader will find Expressive [non-iconic] Abstraction discussed at greater length in Abstract Expressionsm, Tachism and related articles there referred to; Geometrical Abstraction is more fully dealt with in Constructivism, Suprematism, De Stijl, Concrete Art and related articles. [Do look up these terms for a broader picture of the historical development of these two modes of non-iconic abstaction and about the main principles of difference between them.] [Osborne, Harold, editor. The Oxford C ompanion to Twentieth-Century Art. Oxford University Press. 1988.]

Accumulating-ink Method

Action Painting

Active Spectator Participation [Gottlieb, Carla. Beyond Modern Art. New York: E.P. Dutton. 1976]

Aerial perspective

Aestheticism

Aesthetics

Affichiste

Aleatory [Aleatic] - "Depending upon an element of chance or randomness [See Stochasticism]." [Osborne, Harold, editor. The Oxford C ompanion to Twentieth-Century Art. Oxford University Press. 1988.]

Alla prima

All-Over Painting

Amarna art

Amateur

American Scene Painting

Anamorphosis

Ancients

Angry Penguins

Anhui School

Animal Style

Anthemion

Anti-Art

Anti-Form

Antinous

Antipodean Group

The Antique

Applied Art

Applied Work [or appliqué]

Apsara

Arhats

Aquarelle

Arabesque

Archaic Art

Archaic Smile

Archaism

Arriccio [or arricciato]

Ars Moriendi

Art Autre

Art Brut

Art Concret [Konkrete Kunst]

L'Art Contemporain

Art Deco

Art Mobilier

Art Na�f

Art Non-Figuratif

Art Nouveau

Arte Povera

Arte Programmata

Arte Informel [Art Without Form]

Art for art's sake

Art of the Real

Artisan

Arts - Classification [Applied, Fine, Decorative, Liberal, etc.]

Arts & Craft Movement

Assemblage

Ash-Can School

Atelier D'Art Abstrait

Atmospheric perspecitve [An alternative term for aerial perspective]

Attributes

Australia - "An Art Nouveau style which often incorporated local flora and fauna characterized mcuh Austsralian d ecorative art during the 1890s . . . . "[Osborne, Harold, editor. The Oxford C ompanion to Twentieth-Century Art. Oxford University Press. 1988.]

Austria - "Historicism and Biedermeier persisted longer in Austria than elsewhere and were still dominant at the time of the Vienna World Exhibition in 1898. Impressionism and Symbolism had had but a slight impact and Realism little more . . . . ."[Osborne, Harold, editor. The Oxford C ompanion to Twentieth-Century Art. Oxford University Press. 1988.]

Auto-Destructive art

Automatism

Les Automatistes - "A group of seven Montreal abstract painters active during the later 1940s . . . . "[Osborne, Harold, editor. The Oxford C ompanion to Twentieth-Century Art. Oxford University Press. 1988.]

School of Avignon

Ax-cut Brushstrokes

Azulejo




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